discardingimages:

lion-headed peacockMuḥammad ibn Maḥmūd Ṭūsī, ʿAjāyib al-makhlūqāt va-gharāyib al-mawjūdāt, Turkey 16th century.
Baltimore, Walters, Ms. W.593, fol. 178a

discardingimages:

lion-headed peacock

Muḥammad ibn Maḥmūd Ṭūsī, ʿAjāyib al-makhlūqāt va-gharāyib al-mawjūdāt, Turkey 16th century.

Baltimore, Walters, Ms. W.593, fol. 178a

(via sweet-eglantine)

fablesandgables:

Marble statue of a wounded Amazon

Roman, 1st–2nd century A.D.

Marble, H. 203.84 cm (80 1/4 in.) 

Copy of a Greek bronze statue of ca. 450–425 B.C.

In Greek art, the Amazons, a mythical race of warrior women from Asia Minor, were often depicted battling such heroes as Herakles, Achilles, and Theseus. This statue represents a refugee from battle who has lost her weapons and bleeds from a wound under her right breast. Her chiton is unfastened at one shoulder and belted at the waist with a makeshift bit of bridle from her horse. Despite her plight, her face shows no sign of pain or fatigue. She leans lightly on a pillar at her left and rests her right arm gracefully on her head in a gesture often used to denote sleep or death. Such emotional restraint was characteristic of classical art of the second half of the fifth century B.C. 

The original statue probably stood in the precinct of the great temple of Artemis at Ephesos, on the coast of Asia Minor, where the Amazons has legendary and cultic connections with the goddess. The Roman writer Pliny the Elder described a competition held in the mid-fifth century B.C. between five famous sculptors, including Phidias, Polykleitos, and Kresilas, who were to make a statue of a wounded Amazon for the temple. This statue type is generally associated with that contest. [x]

(via centuriespast)

In this sense, empathy isn’t just measured by checklist item 31 - voiced empathy for my situation/problem - but by every item that gauges how thoroughly my experience has been imagined. Empathy isn’t just remembering to say that must really be hard - it’s figuring out how to bring difficulty into the light so it can be seen at all. Empathy isn’t just listening, it’s asking the questions whose answers need to be listened to. Empathy requires inquiry as much as imagination. Empathy requires knowing you know nothing. Empathy means acknowledging a horizon of context that extends perpetually beyond what you can see… Empathy means realizing no trauma has discrete edges. Trauma bleeds. Out of wounds and across boundaries. Sadness becomes a seizure. Empathy demands another kind of porousness in response. — Leslie Jamison, The Empathy Exams
avivajazz:

Tibetan tantric form of the Hindu goddess Kali

avivajazz:

Tibetan tantric form of the Hindu goddess Kali

avivajazz:

John James Audubon, Snowy Owls: The Birds of America. 1827- 1838 

avivajazz:

John James Audubon, Snowy Owls: The Birds of America. 1827- 1838 

buddhabe:

Buddha 

buddhabe:

Buddha 

Do such things as divine forces exist or not? Does a God exist or not? The answer is that it is not certain until we work with the perceiver of that particular energy. In the Buddhist form of meditation we try to look at the perceiver of the universe, the perceiver that is self, ego, me, mine. In order to receive guests, we have to have a place to receive them. It is possible, however, that we may not find it necessary to invite any guests at all. Once we have created the place where guests are welcome, we may find they are there already. — Chögyam Trungpa, The Sanity We Are Born With
Our future depends on the sanity of each of us, and we have a profound stake, beyond the personal, in the project of describing our reality as candidly and fully as we can to each other… It isn’t that to have an honorable relationship with you, I have to understand everything, or tell you everything at once, or that I can know, beforehand, everything I need to tell you. It means that most of the time I am eager, longing for the possibility of telling you. That these possibilities may seem frightening, but not destructive, to me. That I feel strong enough to hear your tentative and groping words. That we both know we are trying, all the time, to extend the possibilities of truth between us. The possibility of life between us. — Adrienne Rich, Arts of the Possible
The basic instruction is simple: Start taking off that armor. That’s all anyone can tell you. No one can tell you how to do it because you’re the only one who knows how you locked yourself in there to begin with. Taking refuge in the dharma is, traditionally, taking refuge in the teachings of the Buddha. Well, the teachings of the Buddha are: Let go and open to your world. Realize that trying to protect your territory, trying to keep your territory enclosed and safe, is fraught with misery and suffering… The teachings of the Buddha are about letting go and opening: you do that in how you relate to the people in your life, how you relate to the situations you’re in, how you relate to your thoughts, how you relate with your emotions. — Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape