In his talk, Anam Thubten said that in order to fall in love with emptiness, we have to ask ourselves an important question: ‘Am I willing to let go of everything?’ In other words, I am willing to let go of anything that is a barrier between me and others, a barrier between me and the world? This is what you need to ask yourself before you can unequivocally make a commitment to embrace the world. But there’s no need to be hard on yourself if your answer is unequivocally ‘yes’ one day and ‘this is too difficult’ the next. Keeping this commitment is traditionally said to be like keeping dust from settling on a mirror. Just as with the warrior’s vow, this vow is easily broken, but we can mend it by simply recommitting to staying open to life. — Pema Chödrön, Living Beautifully with Uncertainty and Change
Please remember that patience is in and of itself a great challenge, and that it often holds the key to breaking through a seeming impasse. — Daily Encouragement by Daisaku Ikeda (via mybuddhistworld)

(via afrogeekgoddess)

The result of the successes of queer incorporation into domains of consumer markets and social recognition in the post-civil rights, late twentieth century, these various entries by queers into the biopolitical optimization of life mark a shift, as homosexual bodies have been historically understood as endlessly cathected to death. In other words, there is a transition under way in how queer subjects are relating to nation-states, particularly the United States, from being figures of death (i.e. the AIDS epidemic) to becoming tied to ideas of life and productivity (i.e. gay marriage and families). — Jasbir K. Puar, Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times
marisa-ramirez:

autora desconeguda

marisa-ramirez:

autora desconeguda

lindarampen:

Illustration i did for our local bee-keeper association.

lindarampen:

Illustration i did for our local bee-keeper association.

(via awesomesplendor)

centuriespast:

China, Jiangling Chu culture, Hubei province (Chinese), Zhenmushou (Two-headed antlered tomb guardian figure) , 4th century BCE/3rd century BCE, wood with traces of red and black lacquer; natural antlers with traces of vermillion lacquer

The Portland Art Museum


Garden of Love, Remedios Varo. 1951.

Garden of Love, Remedios Varo. 1951.

(via mermanonfire)

Utopia in Performance

"In my classes, I encourage them to imagine themselves as citizen-scholar-artists, as people who think about their art practices and their relationship to democracy, not just to their fantasies of popularity. I try to encourage in them an attachment to theater’s possibilities as a place of inspiration and vision, as well as a vehicle for leisure and entertainment. I want them to see a connection between their work as actors, designers, or critics and the state of our world, so that they’ll feel they have something ethical and social as well as aesthetic to contribute. I want them to be moved by what they do, and in that emotion, to feel the potential of their art to reach people deeply. I want to train my students to use performance as a tool for making better futures, to use performance to incite people to profound responses that shake their consciousness of themselves in the world.
Perhaps that, already, is utopian, the idea that theater can do any of those things. Yet that’s the depth of reaction for which I long when I go to the theater - I don’t think we should expect anything less. Theater remains, for me, a space of desire, of longing, of loss, in which I’m moved by a gesture, a word, a glance, in which I’m startled by a confrontation with mortality (my own and others’). I go to theater and performance to hear stories that order, for a moment, incoherent longings, that engage the complexity of personal and cultural relationships, and that critique the assumptions of a social system I find sorely lacking. I want a lot from theater and performance.” ~ Jill Dolan, Utopia in Performance