The basic instruction is simple: Start taking off that armor. That’s all anyone can tell you. No one can tell you how to do it because you’re the only one who knows how you locked yourself in there to begin with. Taking refuge in the dharma is, traditionally, taking refuge in the teachings of the Buddha. Well, the teachings of the Buddha are: Let go and open to your world. Realize that trying to protect your territory, trying to keep your territory enclosed and safe, is fraught with misery and suffering… The teachings of the Buddha are about letting go and opening: you do that in how you relate to the people in your life, how you relate to the situations you’re in, how you relate to your thoughts, how you relate with your emotions. — Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Przemysław Lasak Ceramics

Born on July 14, 1958 in Opole.
In 1986 he graduated the Academy of Fine Arts in Wroclaw under Professor Krystyna Cybińska.
For the best Diploma’86 he got the award of the Rektor of the Academy of Fine Arts and the award of the Minister of Culture and Art. After his studies he was employed in his Academy, from 1999 he works there as a professor.
He won the gold medal at the 47th International Ceramics Competition in Faenza (1991). He took part in numerous ceramic workshop in Wałbrzych, Kamion, Szczyrk and Malaysia.
He is a creator of ceramic cycles – Banners (1986-1996), Hirelings (1996-1998), She (1998-1999), Hope (2000-2003), which were presented at many exhibitions in Poland, Belgium, Denmark, France, Holland, Canada, USA, Germany and Malaysia. He took part in about 190 exhibitions in Poland and other countries.

http://www.quadrilion.pl/artysci/przemyslaw-lasak,4463.html

(via sirobtep)

lambandserpent:

The crow bee (Halictus ligatus) pictured above favors sunflowers and black-eyed Susans, Droege says. “That yellow pollen is almost for sure sunflower pollen.”
“East of the Rockies, [the bee is] everywhere,” he adds. “They’re very common in urban areas and disturbed sites.”

lambandserpent:

The crow bee (Halictus ligatus) pictured above favors sunflowers and black-eyed Susans, Droege says. “That yellow pollen is almost for sure sunflower pollen.”

“East of the Rockies, [the bee is] everywhere,” he adds. “They’re very common in urban areas and disturbed sites.”

How do we work with this tendency to block and to freeze and to refuse to take another step toward the unknown? If our edge is like a huge stone wall with a door in it, how do we learn to open that door and step through it again and again, so that life becomes a process of growing up, becoming more and more fearless and flexible, more and more able to play like a raven in the wind? The wilder the weather is, the more the ravens love it. — Pema Chödrön, The Wisdom of No Escape
newyearoldtricks:

Louise Bourgeois - Spider

newyearoldtricks:

Louise Bourgeois - Spider

(via zadriest)

centuriespast:

Prajnaparamita, c. 1225
Cambodia: Angkor period, 1200-1250Bronze
Prajnaparamita is the bodhisattva of wisdom and the spiritual mother of all Buddhas. The book is a symbol of her wisdom, and the lotus is a mark of her purity. Images of Prajnaparamita became increasingly popular during the 13th century in Angkor. Much of this had to do with the adoption of Buddhism as the official state religion by King Jayavarman VII (r. 1181–1215) and the association he made between Prajnaparamita and his own mother, Queen Sri Jayarajacudamani. Beyond the popularity of Prajnaparamita images during the 13th century, other features date the figure to this time period; specifically, the skirt is neither long nor pleated. Instead, it is a short skirt made of a patterned textile, which had become fashionable during the 13th century.
Norton Simon Art Museum

centuriespast:

Prajnaparamita, c. 1225

Cambodia: Angkor period, 1200-1250
Bronze

Prajnaparamita is the bodhisattva of wisdom and the spiritual mother of all Buddhas. The book is a symbol of her wisdom, and the lotus is a mark of her purity. Images of Prajnaparamita became increasingly popular during the 13th century in Angkor. Much of this had to do with the adoption of Buddhism as the official state religion by King Jayavarman VII (r. 1181–1215) and the association he made between Prajnaparamita and his own mother, Queen Sri Jayarajacudamani. Beyond the popularity of Prajnaparamita images during the 13th century, other features date the figure to this time period; specifically, the skirt is neither long nor pleated. Instead, it is a short skirt made of a patterned textile, which had become fashionable during the 13th century.

Norton Simon Art Museum

badminton:

nocturnal:
満月の紅葉にみみずく
Small Horned Owl on Maple Branch under Full MoonUtagawa Hiroshige

badminton:

nocturnal:

満月の紅葉にみみずく

Small Horned Owl on Maple Branch under Full Moon
Utagawa Hiroshige

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

archaicwonder:

Long Meg and Her Daughters
Long Meg and Her Daughters is a Bronze Age stone circle near Penrith in Cumbria, North West England. One of around 1,300 stone circles in the British Isles and Brittany, it was constructed as a part of a megalithic tradition that lasted from 3,300 to 900 BC, during the Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age.

archaicwonder:

Long Meg and Her Daughters

Long Meg and Her Daughters is a Bronze Age stone circle near Penrith in Cumbria, North West England. One of around 1,300 stone circles in the British Isles and Brittany, it was constructed as a part of a megalithic tradition that lasted from 3,300 to 900 BC, during the Late Neolithic and Early Bronze Age.

(via humanambition)

centuriespast:

unknown Tlingit artist (Tlingit), Trap Figure, 1850/1880, yew,
Portland Art Museum

centuriespast:

unknown Tlingit artist (Tlingit), Trap Figure, 1850/1880, yew,

Portland Art Museum